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Accessibility Workshop

Presenters: Rhonda Bauerlein and Brian Josephson

This workshop provides an overview of accessibility for faculty and staff. It includes instructions on how to use the MS Office 2013 accessibility checker and how to use headers in Word to create a table of contents or bookmarks in a PDF file.

When do you need to caption video?

According to the CCC Distance Education Accessibility Guidelines:

"Per Section 508 guidelines, video files should always be captioned whenever possible, and in most situations they MUST be captioned. Generally speaking, if the video has audio and it will be stored for later or repeated use in a course, it must be captioned. It does not matter if the video is instructor or institution owned, or if it is a collection of clips and snippets; whatever video will be shown in a classroom, placed on a public website, or used in any open forum, needs to be captioned."

"In order to use non-captioned video, the video must be contained in a secure, password-protected environment, there must be no students requiring captioning, and the video can only be used for a single term. Other exclusions to captioning include student work and raw footage that will never be archived after the current use, as well as video with foreign language subtitles."

Benefits of Captioning

Why do students use captions/transcripts and how do they support learning? Why and how often do students who are not deaf or hard of hearing use captions/transcripts? Which subgroups of students use captions/transcripts and how much do they rely on them? Are there common hindrances that can be mitigated?

These questions and more are answered in a national research study done at Oregon State University titled, "Student Uses and Perceptions of Closed Captions & Transcripts".

Study Highlights

  • 98.6% of students find captions helpful
  • 71% of students without hearing difficulties use captions at least some of the time
  • 66% of ESL students find captions "very" or "extremely" helpful
  • The most common reason students use captions is to help them focus
Last Updated: 05/03/2017
  • GCCCD
  • Grossmont
  • Cuyamaca
A Member of the Grossmont-Cuyamaca Community College District